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English Idioms - Looking for Synonyms

My dear friends and my genious students!  Today I am proposing you a little bit different challenge. I am posting the sentences containing idioms, phrasal verbs, etc. and I propose you to rewrite these sentences using the synonyms. The synonyms shouldn't be idioms. In the examples the idioms are in bold. So, I will show you what I mean. 

The given sentence:

At last he found what he had been looking for.

The reply:

He finally found what he had been looking for.

I believe, I've made myself clear about the task. Of course, I will be helping you find the correct synonyms. But the main condition is the same: don't look up your dictionaries and don't read other comments, OK?

So, here you are!

1. We usually see eye to eye with my wife.

2. Her condition after a surgery was touch and go.

3. He was up and about three days after an accident.

4. He was in the red and couldn't make ends meet.

Here are more examples:

He was a gambler and was always in the red.

After he had lost his job, his family could hardly make ends meet.

5. I was trying to talk to my drunk friend, but he suddenly blacked out.

Well, isn't it a tricky assignment?! Ha-ha-ha! I am the one! But I sincerely hope, you will be intersested to guess my riddles! Good luck!

Views: 1195

Tags: idioms, synonyms

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Comment by Danny Clark on April 3, 2016 at 11:36

Dear Elen! We've done it al last! Ha-ha! And it was so obvious! You are European and, of course, you know that drunk people easily go to sleep/fall asleep. So, my poor friend didn't die or fall down (although it was possible) or fainted. He just nodded off. Sure, he was on hangover next morning, but he survived, I tell you! Ha-ha-ha! It was funny, wasn't it?

Comment by Elen on April 2, 2016 at 21:11

Danny, hahaha, yes, your poor friend, haha! Yes, I meant fainted. It passed from my mind to tell you that he slept but I chose this. Now I think it is the correct word. You mean that he slept very quickly because it was drunk and as it is known drunk people sleep easily. Right? :)

Glad that the rest are correct! I know that I have lack of vocabulary and all my answers are with very simple words... :)

Comment by Danny Clark on March 27, 2016 at 13:15

Dear Esma, yeah! You are right!

Comment by Danny Clark on March 27, 2016 at 13:15

Dear Elen! All your answers are almost right, but read my comments, please! It will help you improve your English for sure.

1. "to have the same or very similar points of view". Your answer is right.

2. "nothing was sure" is right. She was in a critical/unstable state.

3. You are right. It means "to get back to normal/ to start living regular life". It is of no matter either you go to work or do your housekeeping. You are up and start working.

4. Most of Western people have debts (to be in the red). "Not to make ends meet" is also right. It is "not to have enough money for living".

5. "To lose sense" is not right as a combination of English words. I think you mean that man fainted, right? But he didn't! 

Poor my drunk friend! He already died, fell down and fainted many times! Ha-ha-ha! I had no idea that this expression will be so hard to guess. "To faint" is right as an option, but drunk people don't usually faint in the direct sense of the word. OK, I'll try to explain again. During the T-storm electricity often blacks out, but not forever. When it blacks out, it gets dark. So, when a person faints his consciousness "turns off", so to say. But when else our consciousness "turns off"? In fact, we all practice it every day. It is so easy, dear!

Will you give it one more try, please?

Comment by Danny Clark on March 27, 2016 at 12:58

Dear SNR! It is! But such method is very efficient and funny! Thank you, dear!

Comment by Esma on March 27, 2016 at 3:01

 In that situation I will have debt.

Comment by Elen on March 26, 2016 at 19:51

1. We usually see things with same way with my wife.

2. Her condition after a surgery was not much good. She was recovering and she was relapsing, nothing was sure.

3. What do you mean? When i recover I go to work or I do housework or anything anyway. Hmm...

He was well and back to everyday life three days after an accident.

Am i right? :)

4. Oh, yes, now I understand. I have met this idioms long time ago but I totally forgot them.

He was in debt and couldn't pay for basic things.

5. I was trying to talk to my drunk friend, but he suddenly lost his senses.

Comment by Danny Clark on March 26, 2016 at 17:43

Dear SNR! Happy to see you here again! It is much better now! But... being a teacher I can always find some fault with you!

So, here is my analysis of your answers.

Most of them are right. So, I will explain only those that are wrong or partialy rirgt.

"To be in the red" means something different. Just imagine you have no money at all, but you need to buy some food, cosmetics, etc. You have a credit card and you buy what you need. If you have no money to pay back, what will you have?

As to "black out'! Poor my drunk friend! He already died, fell down and fainted many times! Ha-ha-ha! I had no idea that this expression will be so hard to guess. "To faint" is right as an option, but drunk people don't usually faint in the direct sense of the word. OK, I'll try to explain again. During the T-storm electricity often blacks out, but not forever. When it blacks out, it gets dark. So, when a person faints his consciousness "turns off", so to say. But when else our consciousness "turns off"? In fact, we all practice it every day. It is so easy, dear!

Will you give it one more try, please?

Comment by Danny Clark on March 26, 2016 at 17:26

Hi again, my dear ladies! Esma is the first to get my reply.

2. Now you are right. The synonym is "unstable/critical".  But your analysis was wrong. Look, "touch and go". After a surgery a person may come to (touch life) and faint (go). But you did it!

3 is also right. The idiom means "to get out of the bed and start working".

5 is right 100%.

But as to No4 I have no idea how to explain those idioms clearer! But I will try.

To be in the red. Just imagine you have no money at all, but you need to buy some food, cosmetics, etc. You have a credit card and you buy what you need. If you have no money to pay back, what will you have?

I think you are not serious about "dying from sadness"! I tell you, if I didn't earn enough money to provide for my family, I would think about a suicide. It would be better for me to die than to feel that shame! I am serious, dear! So, you answer is wrong!

5 is right.  Drunk people usually go to sleep.

Will you try again, please?

Comment by Esma on March 26, 2016 at 15:50

2. I would call her state tricky or delicate (still in danger means unstable)

What I have understood is: her surgery was touch = her situation requires a surgery. and go = the surgery is not that hard (means she is fine and only needs some care of her family like eating well, taking medicines on time and so .. ). But after your analysis I think the meaning is going like this: her situtaion is difficult, still after the surgery wobbling and wavering between life and death.

3. They are probably going to their work.

4. If they don't have money, they might gamble on their houses or cars. He took risk when he lost and couldn't stop from gambling because he is addicted to it, right? 

 If a member of a family who earns the major part of money loses his job, he might probably die of sadness

5. Our consciousness turns off when sleeping (cinch !!! )

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